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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 16, 2013 4:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

There was a comment in a thread below that Bob took over a lot of the songwriting duties cuz Jerry was "a lazy songwriter." My recollection is that Hunter has basically said the same thing. He has some story about how, when he lived with Jerry, he had to drag him away from the TV to write.

So anyway, I did a comparison, and it's not exactly new information, but when you look at it this way ... dang it's striking.

Bob-written songs for GD: 44
Jerry-written songs for GD: 78

And then, how many are essential? I'd say maybe seven of Bob's are essential, not counting co-written ones. Here's Bob's full list of 44 (and that's stretching it with, say, "Little Star"):

Black Throated Wind
Born Cross Eyed
Cassidy
Corrina
The Dwarf
Easy Answers
Estimated Prophet
Eternity
Feel Like A Stranger
France
Greatest Story Ever Told
Heaven Help The Fool
Hell In A Bucket
Hollywood Cantata
I Need A Miracle
Jack Straw
Lazy Lightnin
Let It Grow
Little Star
Looks Like Rain
Lost Sailor
Masons Children (w/ Garcia, Lesh)
Mexicali Blues
Money, Money
Music Never Stopped, The
My Brother Esau
One More Saturday Night
Other One, The
Picasso Moon
Playing In The Band
Sage And Spirit
Saint Of Circumstance
Salt Lake City
Shit Happens
Sugar Magnolia
Sunshine Daydream
Supplication
This Time Forever
Throwing Stones
Truckin (w/ Garcia, Lesh)
Victim Or The Crime
Walk In The Sunshine
Weather Report Suite Prelude
Weather Report Suite Part I

As for Jerry ...

How many of these could you lose? I counted maybe 12-15 I wouldn't miss. That leaves about 65 Essentials. Holy Songwriting, Batman.

Alabama Getaway
Althea
Attics Of My Life
Believe It Or Not
Bertha
Bird Song
Black Muddy River
Black Peter
Blues For Allah
Brokedown Palace
Brown Eyed Women
Built To Last
Candyman
Casey Jones
China Cat Sunflower
China Doll
Comes A Time
Cosmic Charley
Crazy Fingers
Cream Puff War
Cryptical Envelopment
Cumberland Blues (w/ Lesh)
Days Between
Deal
Dire Wolf
Doin' That Rag
Dupree's Diamond Blues
Eyes Of The World
Foolish Heart
Franklin's Tower (w/ Kreutzmann)
Friend Of The Devil (w/ Dawson)
He's Gone
Help On The Way
Here Comes Sunshine
High Time
If I Had The World To Give
Keep Your Day Job
Lady With A Fan
Lazy River Road
Liberty
Loose Lucy
Loser
Mason's Children (w/ Weir, Lesh)
Might As Well
Mindbender (w/ Lesh)
Mission In The Rain
Mississippi Half-Step Uptown Toodleloo
Mountains Of The Moon
New Speedway Boogie
Ramble On Rose
Reuben And Cerise
Ripple
Rosemary
Row Jimmy
Saint Stephen (w/ Lesh)
Scarlet Begonias
Shakedown Street
Ship Of Fools
So Many Roads
Stagger Lee
Standing On The Moon
Stella Blue
Sugaree
Tennessee Jed
Terrapin Station
They Love Each Other
Till The Morning Comes
To Lay Me Down
Touch Of Grey
Truckin' (w/ Lesh, Weir )
U.S.Blues
Uncle John's Band
Wave That Flag
West L.A. Fadeaway
Wharf Rat
What's Become Of The Baby
The Wheel (w/ Kreutzmann)
When Push Comes To Shove



This post was modified by AltheaRose on 2013-02-16 12:18:48

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Poster: stratocaster Date: Feb 16, 2013 5:08am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

only 7 for Bob as essential? Im assuming you are counting the Dwarf in there...

a general regret the band may have is not being more creative...they let things get stale...

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 16, 2013 5:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Yeah, what is that, anyway? And Little Star. Which I guess is the same as Bob Star. I don't think anyone would even know that was "a song" if it wasn't listed that way on tapes. By that token, he should get Yellow Dog Story.

The list is from searching the GD Lyric and Song Finder.

http://www.whitegum.com/introjs.htm?/~acsa/orgfind.htm

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Feb 16, 2013 7:53am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Actually, Weir is way over-represented on your list...7 or 8 of those songs should be stricken from the list since the Dead never played them, or they're duplicates.

Nonetheless, Garcia was a lazy & indifferent songwriter - for the second half of the Dead's career. As he said, he'd rather toss cards in a hat than write songs. Almost all his classic GD songs were written in a 10-year period, from 1967 to 1977.
From '77 to '95, Garcia wrote about twenty songs for the Dead.
But he was still outpacing Weir, who wrote about 12 Dead songs in that period. The thing with Weir was that he wasn't lazy, but he was a slow composer who sometimes took years to finish a song, and not a "natural" songwriter at all. So no, Weir never took over the songwriting duties.

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-02-16 15:53:15

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Feb 16, 2013 9:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I rest my case, your honor.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 16, 2013 9:53pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Here's something interesting. Number-wise, how does Jerry (and Bob) compare to other rock songwriters? Here are some figures, compiled by me (in a lazy way) from, like, Wikipedia and Yahoo Answers. So they're not exactly trustworthy, but just FYI:

Jimmy Page: 83
Bob Marley: 230
John Lennon (just in the Beatles): 172
Dylan: 458
Michael Jackson: 181
Trey Anastasio (solo credit): 140
Roger Waters: 183

So in the context of the Dead, it could be said Jerry wasn't particularly lazy or unproductive. In the context of other writers, he was arguably lazy or unproductive or, maybe more accurately, just not into songwriting.

Of course the Dead were always very comfortable with covering other people's music and initially made brilliant choices that way. In his own band Jerry definitely went in that direction. It seems to me that to be big on songwriting, you really have to be driven to express your own vision or be all about yourself and putting yourself forward. Jerry seemingly had others ways to express his vision (not just ties, LOL, but musically -- e.g., what he did with songs) and he wasn't basically about putting himself forward compared to other musicians.

Basically I guess the guy just wanted to play. Sometimes new ideas came pouring out, but he didn't care to do it on command. He was the old beatnik who, like Maynard G. Krebs, wanted to avoid WORK! at all costs. So he'd have been OK with being called a lazy songwriter (in the sense of unproductive), even during times when it wasn't really true :-)

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Poster: snow_and_rain Date: Feb 17, 2013 8:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

A lot of those guys also took long breaks from touring at one time or another. The Dead was a touring band, and Jerry played with his band between those tours. So maybe lazy isn't the right word. Jerry just had other priorities.

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Feb 17, 2013 8:18am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

From a November '74 interview:

"To me, just because of default, I've fallen into the role of being the main writer in the band. And I'm not really a writer, I'm not really a composer. I'm not even really a singer, you know? But these are roles, and since the band has needed them I've fallen into them, just like we all have. But it's been on me to be the guy who's developing the material. And frankly, I'm tired of my own writing, I'm bored with it. Since it's sort of an artificial situation, I'm not an inspired writer. It represents work. I would rather let it happen, in terms of my own creativity, without the pressure of having to deliver a certain amount of material."

And from '81:
GANS: The songs that you write -
GARCIA: Are few and far between! ...
JACKSON: What prevents you from just sitting back for a few months and doing it?
GARCIA: I'm not a forced writer... I wouldn't want to. I'd rather be playing. If I'm going to be creative, there's plenty of time in my day; it doesn't depend on the amount of time - if I had two months, it's possible that I wouldn't write anything... With songs, some of them are real slow-growing, some of them are moments of inspiration. I can't make them happen. Every once in a while one pops out, all of a sudden it's there.

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-02-17 16:18:31

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Poster: Uncle_John Date: Feb 16, 2013 10:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

That's harsh, Althea - only 7 Weir songs? I count about 20 that made it into regular rotation for a year or more and another dozen or so that were good songs but only played a few times. Sure, he wrote some clunkers, but so did Jerry.

I think Bob's songwriting is much like his playing in that it developed in Jerry's shadow. Bob found his guitar voice in weird chords and counter-point rhythms that gave him a space in the band's sound. His songs are the same way - lots of non-standard time signatures, 'difficult' chords, and challenging melodies. I'd say that many of his songs were less 'essential' because the band didn't play them much because they were relatively challenging to play well.

Jerry's songs, on the other hand, tend to follow well established conventions of rhythm, melody, and chord progression. Jerry was a folk singer at heart and the music he wrote for Hunter's songs reflected that. Most of Jerry's songs could work well as campfire sing-alongs, and that visceral familiarity makes so many of his songs appealing and enduring. Plus, they were (mostly) easy for the band to play.

I'm one who thinks Bob's contribution is under-rated - as a player, as a songwriter, and as a performer. Without Bobby the band would have been good, but I'd say he provided an essential spice that made them great.


Back to the original question - of course Jerry was a lazy songwriter. Jerry was a hedonist. He managed to spend most of his life dong what he wanted to do and avoiding things he didn't want to do. Playing music provides instant gratification, writing music doesn't. I have no doubt that if Hunter's lyrics didn't immediately suggest a melody and chord progression, Jerry would put it off as long as he could.

I suspect that Bob, oh the other hand, worked long and hard crafting his songs. Jerry's songs mostly have the easy, comfortable feel of casual inspiration, while Bob's tend to sound carefully crafted and composed.

- John

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Poster: light into ashes Date: Feb 17, 2013 8:26am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I agree with your description of Weir's songs, though I think it also describes what makes them suffer as songs - there's very few that I'd want to hear at all if they weren't being jammed out by the Dead.
Garcia pointed out in '81, "He constructs everything but the melody; the melody is the last thing to get composed... They're arrangement-strong and melody-weak... They don't have the kind of sung melody you find running through your head." (There are a few exceptions.)

But this I must disagree with:
"Many of his songs were less 'essential' because the band didn't play them much because they were relatively challenging to play well."

Which ones were those? Most of Weir's songs were played plenty of times. The ones that were dropped after a while don't seem to me like forgotten classics. (And some that were dropped, like Born Cross-Eyed or Weather Report part 1, were still very familiar or frequent during the period they were played.) The band actually seemed to thrive on Weir's more challenging material.

This post was modified by light into ashes on 2013-02-17 16:26:07

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Poster: Uncle_John Date: Feb 17, 2013 9:57pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

LiA is right, of course. I shouldn't have spouted off from the top of my head.

Looking at songs that made it into regular rotation for a time and were later dropped for good, it's actually a pretty short list: Cryptical, St. Stephen, Cosmic Charley, Doin' that Rag, Dupree's, Casey Jones, To Lay me Down, Ripple, Weather Report, Lazy Lightning, Lost Sailor, Day Job, Esau, and Push Comes to Shove. I read somewhere that they quit playing St Stephen because it took too much effort/practice to get it right. That may have been the case for a few others on this list, but I suspect that most were dropped because they grew tired of them or they were weak songs to begin with.

Back to Althea's original question - I basically agree with what she suggested for a few reasons: 1. Garcia/Hunter were better songwriters for the reasons I gave in my earlier post and as supported by the Garcia quote cited by LiA. 2. Garcia/Hunter wrote ~twice as many songs, so the G/H vibe permeates the whole Dead canon. 3. G/H wrote a LOT of songs early on that served to define their essential and classic 70's sound.

On the other hand, by the late 70's, Weir had accumulated enough songs that his contribution to their setlists was more significant. I tend to think of the 80's as the Weir years - his songs were more prominent, and he stepped up into the rock star frontman role while Jerry often nodded off into the shadows.

These days I mostly listen to shows from the 60's and 70's when Jerry (and Pig) set the tone, but during my touring days in the 80's it was Bobby who carried the show.

So yeah, Weir's TOO, Sugar Mag, GSeT, Playin', and several others were essential songs during the golden years, but Estimated, Miracle, St of Circ, Stranger, Throwing Stones, etc., were essential tunes in the 80's and 90's.

Were they lazy songwriters? All reports suggest that Jerry was. I wouldn't say Bob was lazy, but he was not very prolific as songwriters go. Jerry wrote more than half his songs before 1975. Bob also had a songwriting peak in the early 70's. From 1976-1994 each of them debuted an average of about one song/year....

- John

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Feb 17, 2013 5:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Well said John - agree wholeheartedly.

Bob played "weird" chords - I like that!

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 17, 2013 7:11am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Oh, it's not meant as harsh or a put-down of Bob or his songs. Sorry if it sounds that way, cuz I agree he's underrated in terms of his contribution. I'm talking about songs that really define the band, as opposed to making it into regular rotation or generally well-written or being perfect vehicles for jams. I just think his contribution wasn't in writing songs that can be described that way -- which also wasn't Phil's contribution, obviously -- and that aspect really jumps out when you look at the songs side-by-side and look at the numbers.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 17, 2013 11:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What did we decide?

I am of the mind that all available info supports my thesis from which I never waiver: he was a grt writer, and productive, though hated it, during the early era, but then, declined, post-75 or so, precisely as predicted.

Right?

And, corollary: Bob wasnt much help at any time...

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Feb 17, 2013 4:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What did we decide?

I think your thesis passed with the necessary votes. But it just occurred to me; wasn't Jerry a great composer rather than a great writer?

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 17, 2013 5:12pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What did we decide?

Yup...sloppy verbiage...rose may get mad.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Feb 17, 2013 5:34pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What did we decide?

Wasn't picking. Everyone said it including me. Unless the connotation of writer has changed and it just means everything related to a song. I grew up thinking every song credit had an 'and' in it. Like Rodgers and Hammerstein or something. :)

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 17, 2013 6:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What did we decide?

Including Garcia.

I think Phil was the only one who might say (or wish he could say) Composer for songs. But luckily we have Wikipedia to sort these things out. And I quote:

>Not to be confused with lyricist.
>Not to be confused with composer.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Songwriter

If you go to the "composer" link, the scholars of Wikipedia elaborate:

>In popular and folk music, the composer is usually called a songwriter, since the music generally takes the form of a song.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Feb 17, 2013 9:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: What did we decide?

And I don't quite accept that, Wikipedia notwithstanding. I would call it the Bob Dylan effect. When I was growing up it was sort of accepted that, in most most cases, somebody wrote the words, somebody wrote the music, and somebody else sang the dang song. After Bob Dylan, you weren't worth shit unless you composed your own stuff and bared your soul or commented on the world. And the onslaught began - James Taylor, Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne, Paul Simon, Carole King (actually she a bridge to the prior era - Goffin and King) etc. and forever the game changed. The era of the songwriter. God knows I bowed at their feet and saw everyone and loved it. But Jerry wrote the music and Hunter wrote the words. So in my mind, Jerry was not a songwriter, he was a composer of many memorable melodies and Hunter was the lyricist.

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Poster: Death&Mercy Date: Feb 16, 2013 7:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I count 12 essential Weir tunes (solo): Cassidy, Estimated, GSET, Jack Straw, Let It Grow, TMNS, Sat Night, TOO, Playin, St Circumstance, Sugar Mag, and Weather Report. The Garcia tunes on the list I could do without include Believe It, Day Job, Liberty, Jed, Push Comes To Shove, and West LA. Not many.

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 16, 2013 8:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Well, I was being really persnickety and just speaking for myself as to what I'd call Essential. But I can pretty easily take away even some on your list that I like fine but don't feel like they express the Heart of What's Great About the Dead (like GSET, Sat Night, St Circ). However, when looking at the Jerry/Hunter tunes, there's almost nothing in the category of "it's nice but, OK, if I have to winnow this down it can go." They almost ALL feel Essential.

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Poster: Death&Mercy Date: Feb 16, 2013 9:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I agree that neither GSET nor St Cir were great tunes in their own right, but each acted as a vehicle to bring out the best in the Dead in their respective periods. How much credit should we give Weir? I guess you could argue that if he had not written the songs, something else just as good might very well have popped up instead. You could probably say the same about a song like TOO (you really can't make that case when it comes to Jerry's best stuff).

Anyway, good discussion.


GSET: http://archive.org/details/gd72-09-28.sbd.bill.12657.sbeok.shnf

St Circumstance: http://archive.org/details/gd81-05-06.glassberg.vernon.17697.sbeok.shnf

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 16, 2013 8:37pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Definitely. But you could also say that about LLR, LL/Supp, Stranger ... actually even PITB. The basic Main Ten theme wasn't written by Weir (or at least I don't think it was; it seems to emerge in a jam), and IMO that's the best part of what's "written."

Basically he has a few moments of individual brilliance (TOO, Sugar Mag) that became inseperably definitive of the Dead, but much of what he wrote pre-80s was interesting mainly because it became a great jam vehicle. So he was doing in songwriting what he did with the band: support the others in a perfect way.

You make a good point that if they didn't have Weir's songs -- his "hooks to hang the musical hat on," basically -- they'd have been doing what? Waiting for Godot? Lesh wasn't going to write. Jerry definitely WAS writing during the time that Weir produced the jam vehicles, and he was writing a lot, but the Dead musical machine was a hungry one. "New every night" means too much of everything isn't even quite enough.

So they needed a lot, and pre-80s, both Bob and Jerry stepped up to the plate and produced a lot. Jerry's stand up on their own as melodies, whereas Bob's tend to work best as vehicles for the others. So he's a fantastic contender for Best Supporting Player. He's Sam Gamgee to Jerry's ... well, I guess Jerry wouldn't really be Frodo.

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Poster: Uncle_John Date: Feb 17, 2013 11:18pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Althea -

Maybe Jerry was more Bilbo than Frodo in that he reluctantly became the leader of the mission but, after finding the ring, was consumed and destroyed by it.

Bob doesn't fit well into the Bilbo scenario.

- John

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Feb 16, 2013 5:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I can't defend my poor choice of words in the face of cold math. The word I should have used is indifferent. But I believe you make my case regardless. I would point out that most of your 65 essential JG songs were written before 1975, and most songs after that period are not high on our list of favorites. (Alabama, Day Job, etc)

I can't remember which book it was in - perhaps Blair Jackson? - where Garcia discusses how songwriting was not his favorite thing to do - on occasion, he avoided or procrastinated during the process.

I'll also add that I really love Garcia songs - how appropriate the settings are for the lyrics.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Feb 16, 2013 3:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I like your word choice of indifferent. Lazy somehow sort of means to me that it was something he ought to have been doing and wasn't. Granted the drugs may have led to decreased output, but he had other outlets for his artistic endeavors so that may have been a reason. Like designing ties.

I guess when I hear lazy songwriter, I take it to mean someone who takes musical shortcuts and doesn't try to get the most out of what they're composing - not going for that extra spark. I never felt Jerry was complicit in that, but what do I know. I'm just a lowly listener. :)

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Poster: unclejohn52 Date: Feb 16, 2013 4:14pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

"someone who takes musical shortcuts and doesn't try to get the most out of what they're composing - not going for that extra spark"

Agree - and I think on latter songs like Standing on the Moon, Black Muddy River, So Many Roads, Days Between - that one could make that case, they're not musically adventurous or outstanding, much as I like them in their simplicity. One of my favs from the latter era is Lazy River Road - the musical setting is perfectly aligned with the lyrics.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Feb 17, 2013 10:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Agree too. I also tend to look at how the lyrics interact with the melody. Sort of like how clothes drape well on a body. The fit.

I do like Days Between - it's the tonality of the melody that gets me and the lyrics fit Jerry's age and voice.

I also think Hunter's lyrics declined over time, not just Jerry's writing. But that's for another thread.

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Poster: Dudley Dead Date: Feb 16, 2013 7:42am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I remember Garcia saying, in an interview, that he "would rather feed the cat" than write a new song (visions of Jerry at the refrigerator, "meYOWW" "shut up","MEthereWYOWWW" "SHUT UP" ... "OK, here you go, just be quiet" ) .
In that DVD of the JGB, there are some great interviews . The one with Hunter is especially good . He felt frustrated, that Garcia didn't seem to put as much care, and time , into his end of the songwriting, as he did . That he could whip out a song really fast
, He cites some, 'I went to the store and he had finished the songs Hunter had given him", sort of stories .
I think he was implying that, as great as Jerry was as a songwriter, he could have been better, if he took more care . But the point is he, in the last 15 years of the band , was not really in to writing , though when he did there could be some great results . Of that group of songs for that never recorded album, how many 60's artists could come up with something like "Days Between" in the 90's ?
There is a steady stream of albums from the first one to "Go To Heaven" in early 80, then only 2 more studio albums for the rest of the band's history ; and the last album of new Garcai solo material,"Run for the Roses" is from 82. I guess we should be grateful (ouch) for ton of great songs he wrote, when the fire was there , especially in that prolific Workingman's >E72, era .

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 16, 2013 8:20am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

It seems he was pretty brilliant at cat feeding, too. And there was a time when he did apparently put more effort into feeding his cat than in writing songs. I think it's Phil who writes that Jerry taught his cat to eat melon balls. You don't get a cat to eat melon balls without spending some time at it, I'd think.

I'm sure Jerry would have said he was a lazy songwriter. Of course, his "lazy songwriting" is like Leonardo's "lazy painting." (Except way more prolific. Leonardo only did about 15 known paintings; he was distracted by other stuff, like anatomy and invention. Jerry's distractions were less productive.)

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Poster: Finster Baby Date: Feb 18, 2013 5:47am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

My family had a siamese when i was growing up that would devour cantaloupe....no training necessary

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Poster: William Tell Date: Feb 18, 2013 1:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Yes, I didn't want to burst any bubbles...I am SURE that Jerry couldn't concentrate on anything other than reading or playing for more than about 30 seconds...he was no work a holic, that's for sure. His immediate gratification approach to life is pretty evident (relationships, food, etc., etc.).

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Poster: AltheaRose Date: Feb 18, 2013 6:08pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

Sigh. And here I thought Jerry's charisma extended to cats. Another legend bites the dust. Or at least the cantaloupe.

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Poster: RJ_Squirrel Date: Feb 16, 2013 6:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

It might have been Conversations With The Dead... he definitely said in one of those books that he hated writing, in so many words. That was when he was well into his drug years.

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Poster: Diamondhead Date: Feb 16, 2013 3:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Was Jerry a Lazy Songwriter?

I like your word choice of indifferent. Lazy somehow sort of means to me that it was something he ought to have been doing and wasn't. Granted the drugs may have led to decreased output, but he had other outlets for his artistic endeavors so that may have been a reason. Like designing ties.

I guess when I hear lazy songwriter, I take it to mean someone who takes musical shortcuts and doesn't try to get the most out of what they're composing - not going for that extra spark. I never felt Jerry was complicit in that, but what do I know. I'm just a lowly listener. :)

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